When Mahatma Gandhi Paid Visit to Dargah Qutubbudin Bakhtiyar Kaki Two Days Before His Assassination

Mahatma Gandhi visited Dargah of Qutubbudin Bakhtiyar Kaki, Mehrauli, Delhi amidst the communal riots on 27th January, 1948. He was killed two days later on 30th January by Nathuram Godse. Generally women were not allowed in the innermost shrine but the condition was waived off in order to allow women with Gandhi inside. 

Mahatma Gabdhi addressing people at the Dargah Qutubbudin Bakhtiyar Kaki

Following is the English text of his Urdu speech;

 

BROTHERS AND SISTERS,

 I would request the sisters to remain silent and give me a few minutes. I had hardly imagined that I would be required  to  speak here. I have come here on pilgrimage. Several days ago I had heard that it might not be possible to hold the Urs at Mehrauli as in the previous 

 years. Had it been so I would have been deeply distressed. I request you—Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims who have come here with cleansed hearts—to take a vow at this holy place that you will never allow strife to raise its head, but will live in amity, united as friends and brothers. Then the world will admit that though we quarrelled among ourselves as two brothers, ultimately we have not turned into sworn enemies. We might be different outwardly  but  after  all  we  are  the offshoots of the same tree. I do not want to talk about one who is a slave  of  Satan.  I  have  seen  life.  This  is  nothing  new.  Even  now somewhere or other fighting is going on. Only today I have read that Hindus have been killed in the Frontier. The Muslims here should be ashamed of it. We have to resolve to cleanse our hearts. The people massacred there are not going to come back. But we must declare and say that we are not going to avenge it by  killing  anyone.  We  will purify ourselves and meet the opponents with love. It would be well for the Hindus if they understood and assimilated this. When I broke my fast it was on the condition that the Hindus and Muslims of Delhi would thoroughly cleanse their hearts. If, however, you persuaded me to break my fast just to keep me alive, it was folly on your part.


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Saquib Salim

Saquib Salim is a well known historian under whose supervision various museums (Red Fort, National Library, IFFI, Jallianwala Bagh etc.) were researched. To his credit Mr. Salim has more than 400 published articles on history, politics, culture and literature in English and Hindi. Before pursuing his research and masters in modern Indian History from JNU, he was an electrical engineering student at AMU. Presently, he works as a freelance/ independent history researcher, writer and manages the website heritagetimes.in

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